October 24, 2017

Posted by: admin October 24, 2017

A Beer by Any Other Name: Porters

Let’s talk porters now; it’s starting to get cold out, and I feel we could all get into a nice dark beer by a fire right about now. The name comes from the porters who carried goods throughout London (who no doubt would love a pint and a fire after work).

Before the 1700s most beers were unaged, publicans blended different casks for the customers (generally an old ale, a new ale, and a weaker one). Porters were the first to be aged at the brewery, and one brewer, Ralph Harwood, produced a beer that embodied all the aspects of the blended ale. Well- hopped and made from brown malt, it was the first beer made on a large scale. The invention of the malt roaster in 1817 introduced black malts, and through the century English Porters (having already arrived in Ireland) made their way to Russia, the Baltic countries and the Americas.

I don’t want to start any arguments by talking about the difference between stouts and porters, but in the 19th century stout was simply used to describe a strong porter, and the theme is history, so I’ll recommend trying Fuller’s Black Cab Stout.

Brewed using 5 malts, this stout -though it drinks quite lightly for a stout- has the roasted coffee, burnt cocoa-toasty goodness you want in the winter. Hints of dark fruits offset the bitterness nicely, and a great beer to start the next few weeks; porter/stout thread!

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